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Allergy Education: Understanding Allergy From Start to Finish For most of us, springtime means sunshine, green grass and blooming flowers. But for some, it can also mean sneezing and watery eyes, or even trouble breathing. Yes, this is all about allergies and it’s causes like grass, flowers, ragweed, peanuts, bee stings, penicillin, soy, and latex. The list is endless. Unfortunately, 40% of the human race is suffering from allergies and the number is going high day by day. But how can a peanut, so small and simple and delicious be so deadly? How can you even understand these allergies? What are the mechanisms of allergies to us? If you’re allergic, do you stand a chance for being cured or from preventing it to happen? Your immune system is meant to keep you healthy, but in people with allergies, they tend to overreact. When a lymphocyte detects an antigen, it begins producing large, y-shaped proteins called antibodies. Antibodies are like having the keys to ten billion different locks (or antigens). The problem is an allergic person’s immune system’s lymphocytes are confused. Allergens are being treated instead like antigens. Scientists don’t know what it is about the structure of these proteins that causes such alarm in some people’s immune systems.
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That’s why just eight foods account for 90% of all food allergies – tree nuts, eggs, soy, peanuts, fish, shellfish, milk, and wheat. During your first exposure, the lymphocytes create antibodies called IgE or Immunoglobulin E. During a parasitic infection, certain immune cells attach to targets and they releasing enzymes to help fight infections. When these enzyme overproduced these can include a runny nose, itching, or hives – localized swelling on the skin.
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The severity of these reactions is dictated by a wide variety of factors, like how much of an allergen is in the body, and how concentrated the immune cells are that have IgE’s bound to them, and how much of the enzymes they’re producing. The histamine is another enzyme here to blame. The function of the histamine is to dilate your blood vessels, increase your body’s mucus production, and to allow your warrior cells to travel to the foreign invader’s site. Hundreds of people in the US die every year from anaphylactic shock caused by the enzyme called tryptase and which is why those who have severe allergies usually carry an epinephrine shot, just in case. Epinephrine is needed for anaphylactic shock. It eases your lungs after injection by constricting the blood vessels, reduces the swelling and helps you breathe faster. It is important to know that the effect of the epinephrine shot last for about twenty minutes only, so for further help seek a doctor right away. The Orland Park allergies specializes in the quick and effective treatment of this condition.